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Wednesday, April 5

  1. page Worst of Friends Reinforcing Activity edited ... 1. Setting up a model letter for the student that says: Dear President _, ... congratulate…
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    1. Setting up a model letter for the student that says:
    Dear President _,
    ...
    congratulate you on .on... Because of
    2. Begin the model letter together as a class. Students will choose a president to write to and will fill in the blanks based on their accomplishments. For example, the students may choose to write to President Washington. They could wish to congratulate him on being the first President of the United States. They could discuss how his leadership has lead America to have a strong government or democracy and that they will eventually be able to vote for their President.
    3. Allow students 20-30 minutes to complete their own letter. The letter does not have to follow the exact format of the model letter, but must address one President, at least one accomplishment, and at least one effect on America or their personal lives. If students wish to go beyond these requirements, they may write goals for the country in the future.
    ...
    1 Chromebook/student
    Printer
    ...
    Strands:__ Government
    Tags: Suzanne Tripp Jurmain, Larry Day, friends, presidents, Jefferson, Adams, government, campaign, election, letters, independence
    (view changes)
    2:20 pm

Thursday, March 30

  1. page Geography edited ... Content Statement: 7. Diverse cultural practices address basic human needs in various ways and…
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    Content Statement: 7. Diverse cultural practices address basic human needs in various ways and may change over time.
    In Our Mothers' House Reinforcing Activity
    The Family Tree
    {familytree.jpg}
    David McPhail (2012). Henry Holt.
    This book begins, many years ago, with a man building a house. As he was chopping down the trees to help build his house, he decided that he was going to leave one tree alone, for shade. Over the next generation's, life changed, but the tree was left exactly where it was, unharmed. Finally, many generations after the original builder, the great-great grandson and his family were living at a house by the tree. The grandson found out that there were construction workers that were going to need to tear down the tree, so the little boy, by communicating with nature, saved the tree and, instead, the construction workers worked around the tree.
    Grade: 1
    Strand: Geography
    Topic: Human Systems
    Content Statement: Families interact with the physical environment differently in different times and places.
    The Family Tree Reinforcing Activity

    Second GradeSecond Grade:
    A Giraffe Goes to Paris
    (view changes)
    7:23 am
  2. page The Family Tree Reinforcing Activity edited Activity: Grade Level: First Grade Approximate Time: 45 Minutes-1 Hour Type of Lesson: Whole G…
    Activity:
    Grade Level: First Grade
    Approximate Time: 45 Minutes-1 Hour
    Type of Lesson: Whole Group/Small Group
    This is an activity that would take place outdoors for the students, rather than inside of the classroom. The goal of this activity is to show students how you can build things that are within our own environment and is to be like a simulation of what it may have been like to build a house in other times.
    Procedure:
    To begin this lesson, you are going to read this book to students, as a whole group, within the classroom. Some questions that you may ask them are things like, “What things are different in this story than they are in our world, today?”. You are trying to get students to make the connection our interaction with the environment and resources has changed over the years.
    Once you finish the book, you will take the students outside to a designated, open area. Before you have taken them outside, you will have set up all of the supplies (sticks, leaves, etc.) for the students to use. Here, you are going to explain to the students’ that they are going to be making a house out of the materials that have been provided.”Boy’s and girls! Today we are going to try and build our own house out of these materials, just like the great-great grandfather did in the story we read”. This will also be the time that you are going to answer questions from the students if they have any.
    You are then going to break the students up into small groups of 4 or 5 students. You will give them a few minutes to discuss and plan out the type of house they are going to build and how they are going to build it. At this time, you will be walking around, listening to what the students are saying.
    After the students are done talking amongst themselves, you are going to allow them to walk around to the different materials, that they think they’ll need, and collect them. The teacher will be monitoring the groups to make sure that there isn’t one group that is taking all of the materials for a station.
    After all of the students have everything that they need. The teacher is going to allow the students to work, within their groups, on their house. They will get approximately 20 minutes to do this part of the activity. At this time, the teacher will be walking around to teach group, observing what it is that they are building. The teacher may even ask questions to the group, such as, “Why do you think it’s important to use these materials?” or “What type of house are you going to build?”. The teacher is also there to offer assistance to the students in building their house, should they need it.
    After the 20 minutes has passed, the teacher is going to have the groups stand up by their house and together, as a whole class, they will spend some time having each group talk about their house. What the group will be addressing is the type of house that they build, the materials they used, and why they decided on using those materials.
    At the end of the activity, the teacher will walk around and take a picture of each group’s house. They will then go back inside of the classroom.
    In the classroom, the teacher will close the activity/lesson by asking the students various questions that connect the activity to the book. Some questions might be:
    “Do you think that it is harder or easier to build a house today than it was many years ago? Why or Why not?”
    “ What do you think some of the challenges were in building a house by hand, many years ago?”
    “How do you think people interacted with the environment many years ago, compared to how they interact with the environment today?”
    “Are there any similarities to how you build a house today as to how you built a house many years ago?”
    Materials:
    Book: “The Family Tree”
    Outside Materials:
    Leaves
    Hay
    Sticks
    Lincoln Logs
    Cloth
    Twine (To tie things together)
    Additional Ohio Academic Social Studies Strands:
    Kindergarten:
    Strand: Geography
    Topic: Human Systems
    Content Statement: Humans Depend on and impact the physical environment in order to supply food, clothing and shelter
    First Grade:
    Strand: History
    Topic: Heritage
    Content Statement: The way basic human needs are met has changed over time.
    Second Grade:
    Strand: Geography
    Topic: Human Systems
    Content Statement: Human activities alter the physical environment, both positively and negatively.
    2. Strand: Geography
    Topic: Human Systems
    Content Statement: Cultures develop in unique ways, in part through the influence of the physical environment.
    Third Grade:
    Strand: History
    Topic: Heritage
    Content Statement: Local communities change over time.
    2. Strand: Geography
    Topic: Human Systems
    Content Statement: Evidence of human modification of the environment can be observed in the local community.
    3. Strand: Geography
    Topic: Places and Regions
    Content Statement: Daily life is influenced by the agriculture, industry and natural resources in different communities.
    “Tags” (Key Concepts):
    David McPhail
    Geography
    Physical Environment
    First Grade
    History

    (view changes)
    7:23 am

Tuesday, March 28

  1. file familytree.jpg uploaded
    6:44 am
  2. page History edited ... Content Activity Needed First GradeFirst Grade: The Camping Trip that Changed America: Theo…
    ...
    Content Activity Needed
    First GradeFirst Grade:
    The Camping Trip that Changed America: Theodore Roosevelt, John Muir, and Our National Parks
    {campingtrip.jpg}
    Barbara Rosenstock (2012). Dial Books.
    Illustrated by Mordecai Gerstein.
    In the year 1903, President Roosevelt wrote a letter to John Muir after reading one of his books about how we are losing so many forests here in America. After receiving the letter, President Roosevelt and John Muir embark on a camping trip to explore the different forests and pieces of land our country had to offer. Once he saw the beauty of this land, President Roosevelt took action to protect our wildlife in America. During this journey, President Roosevelt and John Muir discover what is now known as Yosemite National Park. This book teaches the importance of taking care of our land and our National Parks, and teaches readers that one persons’ actions can make a lasting impact for the world we live in.
    Grade: 1
    Strand: History
    Topic: Historical Thinking and Skills
    Content Statement: Biographies can show how people's actions have shaped the world in which we live.
    The Camping Trip that Changed America Reinforcing Activity

    Christmas in the Trenches
    {christmas_in_the_trenches.jpg}
    (view changes)
    6:41 am
  3. page The Camping Trip that Changed America Reinforcing Activity edited ... Did this event really happen? Why is it important that we save our forests/wildlife? This b…
    ...
    Did this event really happen?
    Why is it important that we save our forests/wildlife?
    This book can also be used to teach social studies in the Geography strand. The topic that it could be used to teach is “Spatial Thinking and Skills”, followed by the Content Statement: “Human activities alter the physical environment, both positively and negatively.”
    Outdoors
    Change
    America
    President
    United States
    Washington DC
    Theodore Roosevelt “Teedie”
    John Muir “Johnny”
    Travels
    Wildlife
    Naturalist
    Yosemite
    The White House
    Mountain Forests
    Vanishing
    Wilderness
    Government
    Letter
    Western States
    Camping
    California
    America’s Forests
    Train
    Raymond, California
    Sequoia Trees
    Bear
    Glacier Point
    Valley
    Nature
    1903
    Protect
    Congress
    Laws
    National Parks
    Wildlife Sanctuaries

    (view changes)
    6:41 am
  4. page The Camping Trip that Changed America Reinforcing Activity edited The reinforcing activity that takes the reader in some detail through the steps of how I would use…
    The reinforcing activity that takes the reader in some detail through the steps of how I would use this book to teach the Topic and/or Content Statement I have selected would be an Inquiry-Based activity followed by a Venn Diagram where students compare and contrast the two main characters of the book, Theodore Roosevelt and John Muir. The inquiry-based activity would look as follows:
    Materials:
    -The Camping Trip that Changed America, by Barbara Rosenstock
    -Venn Diagram page
    -Image of Theodore Roosevelt:
    {https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/b_IEpTDZ6t8ptbLClasnxi25HmHA9NBpp8CFzCEMsbnselmg7M2idvV9f3IPtugpz8ZZ7hyKpKkcDKC1AuBFHXdL4E7qnLjypiPeagEkzJCdieJJ3oE4PP1CqD5OoM23-GbDH8pk}
    Procedures:
    Students listen to me read the book out loud to them in class.
    Throughout the read aloud, the students can take notes on what they are finding interesting in the book.
    As I (the teacher), am reading the book out loud to the class, I am not saying the name, “President Roosevelt.” I will say “President”, but never the president’s name. In doing this, this is creating inquiry-based instruction by me not letting the students know what President is being spoken of.
    Using the clues from the book, the students make observations (book will be passed around/on doc cam after read aloud is complete) to make a guess about who the President in the book is.
    If the students still have not figured it out, I will show them a real image of President Roosevelt, and see if they can guess based on the image.
    If not, I will give them the first letter, “R” of the President from the book.
    Once the students have either guessed the correct President in the book, or I have told them, they will complete a venn diagram where they compare and contrast President Roosevelt and John Muir, based on what they have learned in the book.
    The students can then come to the front of the room and present their venn diagrams in front of the class, and the rest of the students in the class can add to their own venn diagrams.
    Discussion Questions:
    Prior to reading book:
    What do we think this book is going to be about, based on the illustrations on the cover/throughout the pages of the book?
    Why do we think this?
    Do you have any guesses on who the people are on the cover of this book?
    Do you have any guesses on where these people might be during this book?
    Based on the title, how do you think their camping trip changed America?
    After reading book:
    Were our predictions correct about what we guessed the book would be about? How so/not so?
    Who were the two main characters in this book? (After activity is complete)
    Why is this book important?
    Did this event really happen?
    Why is it important that we save our forests/wildlife?
    Another reinforcing activity that can be used to teach this Topic and Content Statement could be as follows:
    Materials:
    -The Camping Trip that Changed America, by Barbara Rosenstock
    -Venn Diagram page
    -Image of Yosemite National Park:
    {https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/R4-VLGwqOuDyKJwDU58IyeOCJaXVJWtWJClj6npN_QSyPxJ-MRtZ_E3ePNrBMoUlUditjJaiyddyAYvvOaLTGVYkdUXJ_SpL7xP7UMiP7ONuWuhw5N5w68x7oWi-vLpGcjVEYDEo}
    Procedures:
    Students listen to me read the book out loud to them in class.
    Throughout the read aloud, the students can take notes on what they are finding interesting in the book.
    After reading the book to the class, I can teach a lesson about Yosemite National Park through the use of this book, images of the park, and other facts/information about the park.
    I can start out by showing students images of the park and reading facts about it, and follow up by having the students make observations about the park.
    Once they do this, they can use information from the book about why this park is important, and how it relates to the book.
    To demonstrate their understanding, I can have the students research different national parks and compare/contrast them to Yosemite National Park using a venn diagram page.
    Discussion Questions:
    Prior to reading book:
    What do we think this book is going to be about, based on the illustrations on the cover/throughout the pages of the book?
    Why do we think this?
    Do you have any guesses on who the people are on the cover of this book?
    Do you have any guesses on where these people might be during this book?
    Based on the title, how do you think their camping trip changed America?
    After reading book:
    Were our predictions correct about what we guessed the book would be about? How so/not so?
    Who were the two main characters in this book? (After activity is complete)
    Why is this book important?
    Did this event really happen?
    Why is it important that we save our forests/wildlife?

    (view changes)
    6:39 am
  5. file campingtrip.jpg uploaded
    6:33 am

Monday, March 27

  1. page History edited ... Miss Mary Reporting is a Children’s Book about a true story of Mary Garber, one of the first w…
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    Miss Mary Reporting is a Children’s Book about a true story of Mary Garber, one of the first women that were successful as a sport’s reporter. It takes the reader through her struggles of finding success as a writer, and how she never gave up in the face of adversity. She even began to have a respect for Jackie Robinson when following his career from the very beginning. Mary Barber changed the world with her perseverance and desire to do what she desired no matter how society reacted.
    Grade: 2
    Strand: History
    Topic:

    Topic:
    Heritage
    Content Statements: Biographies can show how people’s actions have shaped the world in which we live.
    Miss Mary Reporting Reinforcing Activity
    (view changes)
    2:31 pm
  2. page History edited ... Content Statement: 4. Biographies can show how peoples’ actions have shaped the word in which …
    ...
    Content Statement: 4. Biographies can show how peoples’ actions have shaped the word in which we live.
    Marching With Aunt Susan Reinforcing Activity
    Miss Mary Reporting
    {miss_mary.jpg}
    Sue Macy (2016). Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.
    Illustrated by C.F. Payne.
    Miss Mary Reporting is a Children’s Book about a true story of Mary Garber, one of the first women that were successful as a sport’s reporter. It takes the reader through her struggles of finding success as a writer, and how she never gave up in the face of adversity. She even began to have a respect for Jackie Robinson when following his career from the very beginning. Mary Barber changed the world with her perseverance and desire to do what she desired no matter how society reacted.
    Grade: 2
    Strand: History
    Topic: Heritage
    Content Statements: Biographies can show how people’s actions have shaped the world in which we live.
    Miss Mary Reporting Reinforcing Activity

    Now and Ben: The Modern Inventions of Benjamin Franklin
    {NowandBen.png}
    (view changes)
    2:31 pm

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